Sequoia. College student.
Utterly devoted to Harry Potter, Welcome to Night Vale the Marauders, Kingdom Hearts, Lord of The Rings.
Lesserly devoted to a lot of other things.
i don't know what i'm doing do you?

itsalwayssunnyinatlanticcity:

I keep hearing people on the teevee rant about “forced diversity” and “PC fascism” and it makes me wonder how these alternate-universe broadcasts are reaching me here in this world where John Constantine has to be straight and pharaohs are being played by squinty Australian white guys.

zayntreehill:

‘who’s that on your phone wallpaper?’ dONT WORRY

ohhossanight:

I’m not sure what the upside is to having a blue square with soulless eyes as part of a collection is

hellaoptile:

you know how when you go to a concert or show of some sort and the person on stage is like “HOW’S EVERYONE DOING TONIGHT?!?!?!?!” and the audience cheers back? why? you’re not answering the question, you’re just yelling. imagine if we did that in daily conversation. “hey jeff, how are ya?” and jeff just starts screaming and clapping in your face

fangirl challenge: (1/15) pairings
Chihiro & Haku, Spirited Away (2001, dir. Hayao Miyazaki)

tonemonotone:

How to get followers: Just tag all your posts as nsfw. Every single one. They might not get 1000 notes but at least your friends milfloversanus and scoots-mcbuttholes will be there to support you from that point forward.

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

Food doesn’t taste better or worse when documented by Instagram. Laughter is as genuine over Skype as it would be sharing a sofa. Pay attention. Take in nature, hold someone’s hand, read a book. But don’t ever apologize for snapping a photo of a sunrise after a hike, or blogging about the excitement of having a crush, or updating your goodreads account. All of these things are good and should be celebrated. Smile at strangers on the sidewalk and like your friends’ selfies. It’s all good for the human spirit.

cogitoergoblog on Facebook (via meggannn)

(Source: magicalmatt)

gilldoesbookstuff:

“I think maybe everybody falls,” I say. “I think maybe we all do. And I don’t think that’s the asking.” I pull on her arms gently to make sure she’s listening. “I think the asking is whether we get back up again.”  
Patrick Ness, The Knife of Never Letting Go

gilldoesbookstuff:

“I think maybe everybody falls,” I say. “I think maybe we all do. And I don’t think that’s the asking.” I pull on her arms gently to make sure she’s listening. “I think the asking is whether we get back up again.”  

Patrick Ness, The Knife of Never Letting Go

bellamyyoung:

Based on this gifset but with actual diversity.